Archive

Tag Archives: Fashion

The Ama are predominantly female pearl divers from Japan, although their breed is dying out–although new Ama continue to be trained, it is now seen as a grandmother’s job. In a tradition purported to be 2,000 years old, the Ama dived in nothing but a loincloth up until the 1960s. Today, they wear a wetsuit at most. Although this is generally not one’s only job, it is a job that lasts a lifetime–the older divers are reputed to be able to dive the longest.

More can be read about them here, although I prefer to study the images of the Ama through the lens of photographer Yoshiyuki Iwase:

This photograph’s contrast between black and white, extreme posturing of the naked female body, reminds of of Helmut Newton’s fashion photography.

The nude female form in these photographs is presented with awe; their musculature seems asexual in this photo–almost a meditation on human strength. Whereas this:

is a dead ringer for contemporary Western pinup photography. It’s an interesting, mismatched photo series as a whole.

See them all here.

Advertisements

Articles: 

Shenyang’s Oddball Architecture: As I gear up for a year studying the history of Chinese architecture in Beijing, I love reading articles like this (if only to satiate myself!). There’s a great many ‘oddball’ buildings in China–it’s being treated like an architect’s wonderland right now, often with few limits on funding or structure. Sometimes this results in great works of architecture, such as (IMHO) the CCTV tower by Rem Koolhaas/OMA, but then you have the case in point of this article, the Feng Yuan building, a misguided attempt to fuse international modern architecture with Chinese aesthetics.

‘Selma’ Costumes Reveal Class and Consciousness of the Movement: I desperately want to see this movie! I really love seeing costume designers vividly display their characters’ fears, desires, and ambitions in the way they dress themselves.

Meet the Woman Who Can’t Feel Fear:

“Okay. I was walking to the store, and I saw this man on a park bench. He said, ‘come here please.’ So I went over to him. I said, ‘what do you need?’ He grabbed me by the shirt, and he held a knife to my throat and told me he was going to cut me. I told him — I said, ‘go ahead and cut me.’ And I said, ‘I’ll be coming back, and I’ll hunt your ass.’ Oops. Am I supposed to say that? I’m sorry… I wasn’t afraid. And for some reason, he let me go. And I went home.”

The original story was featured on this week’s episode of Invisibilia (NPR), which I thoroughly enjoyed.

Social Issues–A Woman in Uniform: Being a police officer in contemporary America is fraught with issues–it’s a tough life to lead as a man, but I would argue it’s even tougher to occupy that role as a woman. This is an interesting exploration of both one woman’s experience as a NY police officer, as well as an examination of what the literal uniform means to her.

Plan of Watts Towers

Buzzfeed’s Great Middle California Architectural Road Trip: If I ever get back to my home state, I would love to actually complete this trip. I’ve read about the Watts towers and are desperate to see them! (Check out the comments–seems like everyone who has visited thinks it’s pretty cool, too.)

Books: 

Best American Nonrequired Reading 2014: This group of stories/plays/peoms/podcasts/what-have-you was chosen by a select group of high-school-aged kids from around the US. The result is an eclectic (and wonderful) mix of literature. My favorites: ‘An Interview with Mona Eltahawy’ by Yasmine El Rashidi, ‘Embarazada’ by Andrew Foster Altschul, ‘The Saltwater Twin’ by Maia Morgan, and ‘Joy’ by Zadie Smith.

Olikoye Cover Art, via Medium.com

Olikoye: Okay, not a book, but rather a (very) short story, from one of the authors I have heard a lot about in recent months. I’ve been excited to read Americanah by this author (Chimamandah Ngozi Adichie), and this was a great story in and of itself. It tells a family history of sorts through naming rites, shedding light on both the family in particular as well as Nigerian culture.

Random Content from Around the Internet: 

Monolith Controversies Exhibition: Venice, Italy 2014.

Monolith Controversies: The award-winning Chilean entry into the Venice architecture biennale 2014. This exhibition is about the prefabricated concrete block and how it came to shape residential space in turbulent 1970s Chile (during that era, Chile faced a 180 degree political turn from the communist policies of Salvador Allende, to the conservative, religious dictatorship of Pinochet via coup).

Articles: 
The Shadow of Anti-Semitism in France: After the Charlie Hebdo attack, there have been a lot of think-pieces analyzing both France and Germany’s often-xenophobic leanings at large. Although right now the focus is on the muslim minority, I think it’s pretty telling that 74% of French Jews have considered leaving their home and/or adopted country–it’s not easy to exist on the imposed “outskirts” of French society.
A History of the Color Pink:  Growing up with the concept of Girls=pink, Boys=blue etched viscerally into my childhood memories, learning this offers me relief. As I get older (and as one might be able to tell, more staunchly feminist), I’m happy to let go of many of the ideas I once held that adhere strictly to America’s blinder-toting gender binary.
Serial is Real: This short article talking about the legal repercussions of having (or not having) power in the United States due to race and notoriety just adds another voice in the argument that our justice system is broken. I was a huge fan of Serial (the NPR podcast), and listening to that tale of a case that failed to see justice for the accused (whether he did it or not) has me feeling a little down about the current state of the union.
Invisibilia Podcast: Brand new podcast that just debuted at #1 on itunes. Invisibilia’s first episode talked about our innermost thoughts, and whether or not they are representative of our nature through a few stories of people who have grappled with that issue firsthand.

 

Books: 
Women in Clothes: I’m almost finished with this MASSIVE compendium of the collected thoughts on fashion from 700+ women. If there was ever a book tailor-made to suit me, this is it. Women speak about the thoughts and mental hoops they jump through to get themselves ready in the morning, from the imprint of their mother’s style on their lives, to their own understanding of what looks good on them, to the mantras and philosophies that they dress by. Five stars (out of five) so far.

 

Content from the corners of the internet: 
^Every David Bowie Hairstyle (Dollychops.tumblr.com)
This thread (“The Beginner’s Guide to Italian Style”) on reddit’s r/femalefashionadvice had me reeling. Not only did I not like the recommendations offered by the author, I really resented her steel-minded focus on achieving “femininity.” There were many who loved the guide, but I found it insulting and demeaning–from tips like “drink more water!” (which has zilch to do with dressing like her version of a perfectly-thin Italian woman with bronzed skin and an ‘almost animal sensuousness’) to the ridiculous, stereotypical expectation she has of women, I was truly annoyed. (And in my personal experience, I have met more than one androgynous/plus-size/non-‘bronze’ Italian woman who also happens to be beautiful and proud of their status as Italian.)

 

Until next week!
Alicia

I have spent countless hours sifting through blog posts about Chile, reading Spanish novels (a term I use loosely as the current read happens to be a teen novel translated into Spanish from English), and just generally missing the place in the past few days. It feels like ages since I’ve seen many people that are like family to me: my boyfriend Francisco, his entire family, my once-host family, and the friends and acquaintances that made my time there incredible. I’m even missing the (insane, copious) amount of mayonnaise that they spread over every food item in their path (although I still do not miss manjar, that sticky caramel-y stick-to-your-arteries substance that Francisco adores). All in good time, I suppose–and in the meantime I can consider my explorations in the blogosphere a form of research for my quickly-approaching senior thesis about Mapuche art within Chilean culture.

I’m getting knee-deep into my exhibition on John Baeder now. I’m a few paragraphs into my rough draft, which needs to be finished within the week–I think I should start hitting the library soon or else I’m never going to get anything done.

I’m also going to be working with the head of academic programs at the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru in order to create new material having to do with Latin American Art for Smarthistory–the website is a fantastic resource for Western art, but is notably lacking in academic articles about the art of the Americas, Africa, Oceania or Asia, which they are in the process of correcting.

Anyway, here is a picture of the Museé de la Mode et du Design in Paris, where I was lucky enough to be able to visit an exhibit on the trademark style of the Spanish couturier Balenciaga maintained throughout the past 100 or so years:

View from the Seine


View from inside the green shenanigans

Great Blogs from English Expats in Chile:
Way South of the Border
Cachando Chile: Reflections on Chilean Culture
Bearshapedsphere (a travel blog by a professional freelance writer)